Legacy Good Samaritan celebrates heart failure nurse’s prestigious certification

Robin Klotz is just one of 436 Certified Heart Failure Nurses in the world

Portland, Ore.—Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center today announced that Heart Failure Nurse Coordinator Robin Klotz, RN,BSN, PCCN has become a Certified Heart Failure Nurse (CHFN) and a member of the American Association of Heart Failure Nurses’ (AAHFN). As a CHFN, Klotz will be able to deliver better outcomes to patients, decrease their length of stay in the hospital, and perform more comprehensive follow ups. Klotz will have access to valuable resources, literature and professional contacts in the United States and Canada that will allow her to stay attune to the best practices and most cutting edge treatments for heart failure patients.

“Legacy Good Samaritan is committed to providing exceptional heart failure care to our patients,” said Cindy Evans, RN, MS, Hospital Nurse Executive at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. “Robin’s new designation will allow her and her team to have constant access to cutting edge heart failure treatments and practices. We applaud Robin’s skill and determination in earning this respected certification; she is truly an invaluable asset to our patients, our staff, and our community.”

With only 436 CHFNs worldwide, certification is a very competitive process. To become certified, Klotz took the Heart Failure Nursing Certification Exam at the AAHFN June 2012 annual conference where she was tested on contemporary heart failure education and practice requirements. The purpose of the certification, which was developed by the AAHFN Certification Board (AAHFN-CB), is to promote the highest standards of practice within heart failure diagnosis and treatment, establish a common knowledge base required for practice, and encourage and promote continued educational growth among heart failure nurses.

Affecting nearly 5 million Americans, heart failure is a common condition that is often misdiagnosed and unrecognized. It is a progressive condition often caused by a heart attack, high blood pressure, or other injury that causes the heart’s muscles to weaken. This decreases the ability of the heart to pump blood and this can make patients feel weak, tired, or dizzy. It also causes water to leak out of the blood vessels into the lungs, which can cause shortness of breath and the legs to swell. Often times people are unaware they are experiencing heart failure because they mistake it for signs of aging.

About AAHFN

The American Association of Heart Failure Nurses unites professionals in the support and advancement of heart failure practice, education and research to promote optimal patient outcomes. AAHFN is dedicated to advancing its nursing education, clinical practice and research with the goal of setting the highest standards for heart failure nursing care. Learn more at www.aahfn.org or 888-45-AAHFN.