Legacy in the News: Randall Children’s Hospital needs votes to bring photography program to patients with cancer and blood disorders

The Oregonian, The Columbian and FM News 101 KXL  

March, 25, 26 and 27, 2014

The Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Program at Randall Children’s Hospital at Legacy Emanuel has been selected as the only Oregon finalist to receive Pablove Shutterbugs, as part of the LIVESTRONG® Community Impact Project. The project was created to bring proven cancer support programs to communities across the U.S.

Grantees will now be determined through a public, online voting campaign on vote.LIVESTRONG.org beginning at 8 a.m. Monday, March 24 and ending at 3 p.m. Friday, April 11.
After the voting period comes to a close on April 11 at 3 p.m., the 39 organizations with the top votes in seven geographical regions across the country will receive up to $15,600 to replicate and implement one of three sustainable programs dedicated to supporting people living with cancer.

“Bringing Pablove Shutterbugs to Randall Children’s Hospital through the LIVESTRONG Community Impact Project will allow children to capture and express their thoughts, feelings and emotions in a way that few are privileged to experience. It will also foster self-esteem and a sense of greater connectedness,” said Nameeta Richard, M.D., pediatric hematologist and oncologist at Randall Children’s Hospital.

The Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders program treats approximately 130 children with cancer each year and is committed to supporting children and families in their personal fight against cancer, as well as to working collectively to win the war against childhood cancers.

Hundreds of qualified hospitals, cancer centers, universities and non-profits from across the U.S. applied to be part of the LIVESTRONG Community Impact Project in 2014. Randall Children’s Hospital is one of the organizations still in contention for the award. If selected, the Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Program will use the awarded funds to help its patients to feel empowered and inspired as they travel down their road of treatment and recovery.

Pablove Shutterbugs, the signature arts program of The Pablove Foundation, teaches children living with cancer to develop their creative voice through the art of photography. Many of children are removed from school during their illness and treatment, which leads to a disruption in their daily routines. Through Shutterbugs’ carefully designed curriculum, students have the opportunity to develop pride and an enhanced self-esteem as they learn challenging, new skills. Trained professional photography mentors guide its students through a series of lessons created specifically to encourage photographic creativity. They gain hands-on experience while learning the principles and techniques of photography including the basics of composition, lighting and perspective. Each of their students keeps their point-and-shoot camera kit at the end of the program to encourage them to go out and see the world differently and continue practicing their art form as young photographers. The goals for the students include: increasing their sense of joy, encouraging their creative thinking, fostering their self-esteem and developing their independence. Watch a video about the program.

Read The Oregonian's story.

Contact: Maegan Vidal