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Stay healthy at every age 

Regular screenings and tests are part of overall health, wellness and self-care. These screenings and tests encourage a healthy lifestyle, strengthen the relationship with your provider, keep your vaccinations up to date and screen for medical issues – just to name a few of the benefits. Here’s an easy to follow checklist of the vaccinations, screenings and preventative health measures to support you at every stage of your life.  

Screening and testing checklist for all ages 

Keep the communication with your healthcare provider honest and collaborative. Ask questions and be an active participant in your health.  

In your 20's and 30's 

Vaccinations

  • Flu shot, every year 
  • Tetanus booster, every 10 years
  • Tdap booster (Whooping cough) - If needed 
  • HPV (Human papillomavirus) vaccine

Screenings

  • Pap smear: In the past, a Pap smear test to screen for cervical cancer was recommended for girls after they had been sexually active for 3 years, or at age 21, whichever came first. But the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Cancer Society now recommend that all women have their first screening at age 21, regardless of when sexual activity starts. 
  • Sexually transmitted disease (STD): If you’re sexually active and under 25, talk to you provider about recommended yearly screenings for chlamydia and gonorrhea, and others, depending on your history.  
  • Blood pressure
  • Cholesterol
  • Type 2 diabetes

Talk with your healthcare provider about: 

  • Birth control (contraception) options 
  • Healthy habits: Exercise, diet and sleep habits 
  • Substance use: Alcohol, nicotine (smoking, vaping, etc.) and drug use.
  • Stress, anxiety, mental and emotional health 

Note: These recommendations do not include pregnancy information. Please visit our for pregnancy section for more information. 

In your 40's and 50's 

Vaccinations

  • Flu shot, every year 
  • Tetanus booster, every 10 years (if needed) 
  • Shingle vaccine, at age 50  

Screenings

  • Mammography: At 40, talk with your healthcare provider when to get a mammography screening for breast cancer. Age and frequency of the screening is dependent on risk factors, such as family history.  
  • Pap smear:American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommendto have a pap smear every 3 years screening for cervical cancer.
  • Sexually transmitted disease: Get tested yearly for chlamydia and gonorrhea as long as you have multiple or new sexual partners or a partner that has a sexually transmitted disease.  
  • Cholesterol: Speak with your healthcare provider about when you should be tested, and depending on health history and risk factors, how frequently you should have this test.
  • Type 2 diabetes: Starting at age 45, the American Diabetes Association recommend all people should be tested for Type 2 diabetes every 3 years.  
  • Colonoscopy: At age 50, talk to your healthcare provider about a colonoscopy to screen for colon cancer.  

Talk with your healthcare provider about: 

  • Birth control (contraception) choices 
  • Perimenopause or “around menopause: Talk about what to expect, symptoms, etc. 
  • Healthy habits: Exercise, diet and sleep habits
  • Substance use: Alcohol, nicotine (smoking, vaping, etc.) and drug use. 
  • Stress, anxiety, mental and emotional health

In your 60's and beyond

Vaccinations

  • Flu shot, every year
  • Tetanus booster, every 10 years (if needed) 
  • Shingle vaccine, if you didn’t get one in your 50’s
  • Two pneumonia vaccines, starting at 65. The CDC recommends an initial vaccination then a second dose a year later. 

Screenings

  • Mammography: Continue with mammography's to screen for breast cancer. Providers differ in their recommendations regarding frequency of the screening.  
  • Pap smears: Some women stop having regular Pap smears around the age of 65. Discuss with your healthcare provider their recommendation for you.  
  • Bone density test: It’s recommended to have a bone density test at age 65 which tests for osteoporosis. [LINK to Osteoporosis detail page] However, if you have certain risk factors such as early or surgical menopause, low body weight, history of smoking, history of fractures (broken bones), history of taking prednisone and thyroid disease, talk to your healthcare provider about getting this screening earlier.  
  • Sexually transmitted disease (STD): Get tested yearly for chlamydia and gonorrhea as long as you have multiple or new sexual partners or a partner that has a sexually transmitted disease. 
  • Cholesterol: Speak with your healthcare provider about when you should be tested, and depending on health history and risk factors, how frequently you should have this test. 
  • Type 2 diabetes: Starting at age 45, the American Diabetes Association recommend all people should be tested for Type 2 diabetes every 3 years.  
  • Colonoscopy: Continue screening for colon cancer, per your healthcare providers recommendation. 

Talk with your healthcare provider about: 

  • Healthy habits: Exercise, diet and sleep habits 
  • Chronic conditions, such as arthritis and diabetes may become more of a concern during these years.
  • Substance use: Alcohol, nicotine (smoking, vaping, etc.) and drug use. 
  • Stress, anxiety, mental and emotional health